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Camera Framing: Shot Composition & Cinematography Techniques Explained [The Shot List, Ep 2]

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Camera Framing: Shot Composition & Cinematography Techniques Explained [The Shot List, Ep 2]

Camera Framing Cheatsheet ►► https://bit.ly/framing-cs Create a Free Shot List ►► https://bit.ly/shot-listing-app More examples of Camera Framing ►► https://bit.ly/framing-examples Ultimate Guide to Camera Shots, Angles and Movements ►► https://bit.ly/shot-size-guide Camera framing is just one of the many cinematography techniques we’ve all had to learn. Choosing your subject(s) for each shot might seem intuitive but how do you frame them? Do you isolate them in a single or “complicate” things with a “dirty single”? When should you use an over the shoulder shot and does that shot composition always make sense? These are the types of questions we cover in this episode of The Shot List. A “single” makes sense any time you want to isolate a character, this is such a common framing technique that we barely register them. Adding another character (any number of characters) suddenly changes the dynamics of the moment. Two shots, three shots, all the way up to crowd shots signal a relationship between these subjects. This relationship can be romantic, contentious, awkward, or comedic. These shot compositions all have their place in visual storytelling and every filmmaker should have a firm grasp of this language. Filmmaking is all about choices and with so many variables to choose from, this isn’t always an easy process. Visual storytelling can be as simple as shooting each character in a single or always shooting over the shoulder shots for a conversation. But don’t underestimate the power of a well-timed and well-placed two-shot. Or the magic that can happen when a POV shot puts the audience in the character’s shoes. With these simple framing and composition techniques, you can elevate your visual storytelling beyond the expected. #filmmaking #directing #cinematography — Music by Artlist ► http://bit.ly/2Ttdh8d Music by Soundstripe ► http://bit.ly/2IXwomF Music by MusicBed ► http://bit.ly/2Fnz9Zq — SUBSCRIBE to StudioBinder’s YouTube channel! ►► http://bit.ly/2hksYO0 Looking for a project management platform for your filmmaking? StudioBinder is an intuitive project management solution for video creatives; create shooting schedules, breakdowns, production calendars, shot lists, storyboards, call sheets and more. Try StudioBinder for FREE today: https://studiobinder.com/pricing — Join us on Social Media! — Instagram ►► https://www.instagram.com/studiobinder Facebook ►► https://www.facebook.com/studiobinderapp Twitter ►► https://www.twitter.com/studiobinder

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